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15 foods that are illegal in the United States

America might be the land of the free, but when it comes to food, Uncle Sam has put up a few restrictions. If you live in the United States and have a hankering for haggis or horse meat, you’ll have to hop the pond. For others, you’ll have to head to Africa or Asia. As Americans, we can enjoy endless, delicious food options at a moment’s notice, so we may wonder why anyone would want to eat some of this stuff anyway. Paralysis-causing puffer fish? Fatality-causing fruit? No thank you! We’ll take a Whopper. Here are 15 foods illegal in the United States: https://www.instagram.com/p/BtCV0oTlIT2/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link Horse Meat Horse meat is actually a fairly popular food in other countries. Travel to Mexico, Switzerland, Japan, Germany, China or Poland, and you’ll find people eating it without a second thought. But in the U.S. slaughtering horses for food is considered illegal, as is the importation…

You would never guess this country consumes the most candy

Americans love candy. We have several holidays where we put the sweet stuff at the center of the celebration — Halloween candy, Easter baskets, candy-filled advent calendars and candy canes. We even have amusement parks dedicated to it. You’d be forgiven for assuming Americans eat more candy than any other country — but you’d also be wrong. There is one country that beats out the U.S. in candy consumption: Sweden. A recent study conducted by Jordbruksverket, the Swedish Board of Agriculture, found that Sweden has the highest candy consumption per capita in the world. Citizens consume on average 35 pounds of it every year. Doing the math … that’s about a half pound every. single. week. The sugar consumption is about three times more than what the World Health Organization recommends. Candy culture in Sweden is strong. “Lördagsgodis” is a Swedish word that literally means “Saturday candy.” The thinking went that…

17 Lucky New Year’s Traditions from Around the World

This New Year’s Eve people all around the world will clink glasses and toast to the coming year. In the U.S., Midwesterners will cook pork and sauerkraut, while Southerners will feast on black-eyed peas and collard greens. Traditions like these vary around the world, but all have one thing in common — wishes for good luck and prosperity in the coming year. Here are some other fun ways folks will hope to find good fortune with the turn of the calendar. Spain: Grapes In Spain some revelers will celebrate the New Year by eating twelve grapes at midnight. Each fruit is said to represent 1 month of the year, so for instance, if the second grape is sweet, February will smooth sailing. If the third grape is sour, March could get rocky. Italy: Lentils Since lentils resemble little coins, it’s thought eating them on New Year’s will bring wealth and prosperity.…

Brad Pitt to open new restaurant, resort in Croatia

Soon, Brad Pitt will be able to add the title “hotelier” to his resume. The actor, activist, producer and father of six is the latest celebrity to step into the world of hospitality. People magazine reported Pitt’s plans to open a new luxury resort in Croatia. The massive development will break ground in at the small coastal town of Zablace and will also include a hotel, villa, shops, a golf course, and several restaurants, the Telegraph reports. The project is estimated to cost more than $1.5 billion and will be “a modern ecologically-responsible planned community.” The 52-year-old actor recently stayed overnight in Sibenik’s new Dogusevon Hotel, toured the town and embarked on a walking tour with a team of 10 people around the proposed site of his new investment. Among them was Nikola Basic, creator of the celebrated Sea Organ, a giant culture that creates music as water is passed through its…

The fate of your confiscated airport food

A bustling travel season is in full swing, and while we’re all familiar with the airport security screening process, it can still be easy to make a mistake when an open water bottle or piece of fruit gets forgotten in your backpack. But what happens to these food items after they’re confiscated? These airport checkpoints don’t exist simply to inconvenience you, but rather to protect our American agriculture from threat. In a video by Great Big Story, U.S. customs supervisor Ellie Scaffa tells the story of what happens to these illegal imports down the line — and no, the TSA staff doesn’t get to sit around feasting each evening. “I’ve been threatened with my life,” she says about her efforts at New York’s JFK Airport where she personally sorts through up to 600 pounds of illegal produce per day. All confiscated goods, whether it be Chinese beef candy or Jamaican mangoes,…