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Where you can get freebies on National Pretzel Day, April 26, 2019

Love pretzels? Go carb crazy this Friday, April 26, 2019, on National Pretzel Day and score any (or all!) of these fresh-baked soft pretzel freebies from these national retailers. No one has to twist our arm! Auntie Anne’s From April 26 through April 28, 2019, buy any one pretzel and get an Original or Cinnamon Sugar Pretzel for free. Just download the coupon on their website, or download their app to find the coupon. If you’re feeling generous and want to bring pretzels to the office, Aunti Anne’s is also offering $25 off of and $100 catering order when you enter code “NPD25” at checkout. Code is only good April 26. Ben’s Soft Pretzels Ben’s is giving away a free soft pretzel when you make a donation of at $1 to the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund at participating locations. Philly Pretzel Factory No purchase and no coupons necessary. Just stop…

Survey shows liquors bartenders recommend most

If you sidle up to any bar in America and order a nondescript round of shots (and thereby slightly annoy your bartender), you better like Jack Daniels. A recent survey found that bartenders are more likely to pour you a shot of the classic Tennessee whiskey than any other liquor. The MetrixLab MSS Bartender Influence Study asked nearly 10,000 bartenders in the United States to rank all major spirit brands and how likely they are to recommend them to a customer. The results were broken down into categories. Along with being the most-recommended shot/shooter, Jack Daniels is also the most recommended brand of whiskey. The only other brand of liquor to appear twice on the list was Bacardi, as the most-recommended rum and the most-recommended flavored spirit. Patrón was the most-recommended spirit overall, which is great news, since it supposedly can help you lose weight. Grey Goose took top spot…

How to recycle plastic grocery bags

If you recycle, you probably already know that most communities don’t accept plastic bags in their weekly curbside pick-up bins. This creates a problems for just about every household. After all, even the most diligent of us wind up with a few plastic bags when an impromptu grocery shopping trip breaks out. Throwing bags in the garbage may seem like a solution, but plastic bags aren’t biodegradable, meaning they can take hundreds of years to decompose. The best thing you can do is recycle them. So if curbside recycling won’t accept them, how do you recycle plastic bags? It’s as easy and taking them to a nearby store. National retailers like Walmart, Whole Foods, Target, JCPenney, Kohl’s, Home Depot, Lowe’s, and many regional retailers like Giant Eagle, all offer onsite plastic bag collection bins and boxes. No need to separate where your bags came from, as these retailers will accept…

25 Celebrities who shares names with food

Nearly 15 years ago, Gwyneth Paltrow made headlines when she named her newborn daughter Apple. But she’s not the only celebrity that has the culinary world to thank for inspiration. Many celebrities have intentionally turned to food monikers when naming their children, while others have inherited a hunger-inducing last name. Whether it’s fruits, meats, spices, or grains, here are a handful of celebrities that share a name with food. https://www.instagram.com/p/BoRz6dXlRXT/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link 1. Apple Martin The daughter of Gwyneth Paltrow and British singer/musician Chris Martin, Apple was born May 14, 2004 in the midst of a flurry of tabloids reporting her unusual name. 2. Kevin Bacon A famous American actor with a lengthy list of roles and accolades including A Few Good Men, Apollo 13, and Footloose. Bacon inherited his crave-worthy last name from his father, Edmund Norwood Bacon, a respected architect in Philadelphia. 3. Brandy Norwood Known simply as Brandy, this…

Lasagna or lasagne: Which is correct?

Lasagne or lasagna? It’s everyone’s favorite cheesy Italian casserole. Layers of al dente noodles create a deliciously starchy structure on which we pile creamy ricotta, tomato-y meat sauce, and melty mozzarella. It’s a comfort food like no other. But what’s with the spelling? Have you noticed sometimes lasagna ends in an ‘e’ rather than an ‘a’? While it might seem like they are interchangeable (and they basically are in the U.S.), there is actually a method to this pasta madness. In Italian, ‘lasagne’ is the plural name given to flat, rectangular pieces of pasta. Whereas ‘lasagna’ is actually the singular form of ‘lasagne.’ ‘Lasagna’ is also the American English spelling of the word, with ‘lasagnas’ being the American plural. English speakers outside of North America usually use ‘lasagne.’ Whether you spell it with an A or an E, the pronunciation is the same. The last syllable sounds like “ya” —…

Eating garlic could help protect your memory, new study shows

You might miss out on some smooches, but a new study suggests that consuming garlic may help protect your memory. Scientists at the University of Louisville found that eating garlic may reduce age-related problems with memory. As it turns out, allyl sulfide, the same sulfide compound that gives us “garlic breath” also improves our gut health, which is one factor in cognitive function. If people eat more garlic, the study’s authors believe people could see a reduced risk in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. For the study, researchers gave oral allyl sulfide to 24-month-old mice (basically 56 to 69 years of age in human years). They then compared these mice with 4- and 24-month-old mice not receiving the allyl sulfide supplement. The older mice that received the garlic showed better long and short term memories, as well as a healthier gut bacteria, than the mice that didn’t receive…

What’s the difference between an English muffin and a crumpet?

When it comes to breakfast breads, most of us are carb-loving connoisseurs. Toasts like wheat, rye, and sourdough are just the beginning. Scones, muffins — both blueberry and bran, biscuits and bagels make their way into our morning meal more commonly than we’d care to admit.  And of course you know the English muffin. It’s the sturdy, humble base to your oozing Eggs Benedict and the spongy exterior of your McDonald’s McMuffin. English muffins, and all of these other common carbs, are sold in the bakery and bread aisles of just about any grocery store nationwide. So that leaves the crumpet.  What the heck is it? You’ve probably joked about tea and crumpets in your best stuffy-English accent before, but did you really know what you were talking about? Have you actually ever seen one in the States? English muffins and crumpets are two entirely different creatures, but they have…

10 bad kitchen habits you need to break now

We all make mistakes in the kitchen — especially when we’re just starting out. But great cooks learn to be great by learning from their mistakes. Whether you’re a seasoned professional chef or a 20-something try-hard, if you’ve picked up any of these bad habits in the kitchen ditch them right now! Your cooking is suffering and you might not even know it. 1. Your knives are always dull When you’re using a dull knife, you actually increase your risk of getting injured. A sharp knife easily slices through anything, but a dull blade needs some force. This means it’s more likely to slip out of your hand and cut you — possibly seriously. If you don’t know how to properly sharpen a knife, no worries. You can get it done by a professional relatively cheaply. Once sharp, remember to store them with their blades protected in knife guards. Never…

This is how the ‘continental breakfast’ got its name

Maybe you booked one hotel over another because it served a free continental breakfast. The idea of starting your day with a complementary all-you-can-eat buffet is just what some travels dream of. But if you take a moment to think about it, there isn’t anything especially “continental” about juice and muffins. So what’s with the name? The term “continental breakfast” actually  originated in Britain in the mid-19th century. There, the phrase “the continent” refers to the countries occupying the mainland of Europe. Therefore, a “continental breakfast” denotes the type of breakfast you’d be served in places like France or Italy. Breakfasts in these countries are famously light and delicate when compared to the full English breakfast — a heaping plate of sausage, beans, toasts, eggs and more — or an American breakfast — usually some combination of sausages, bacon, pancakes, waffles, potatoes, and toast. As the nation grew and hotels…

5 Types of foods to avoid cooking in your cast iron skillet

When you get your first cast iron skillet, you’re eager to see how much it can master. Sizzling grilled cheese? Check! Fajitas? Check! You’ll start to eat skillet dishes six nights a week just because you love the flavor and the simplicity. But even Superman has his kryptonite. Here are 5 types of food you should steer clear of in your cast iron skillet. 1. Acidic Foods Cast iron can’t handle large quantities of acidic foods very well. Acidic foods allow the metal to leach into your foods, but they can also breakdown your seasoning.  This means like foods with tomato sauce, vinegar or lemon-based sauces will pick up a metallic taste from the pan. This can happen in as little as a half hour, so if it’s a white wine chicken dish you’re going for, make the marriage of the two quick, or better yet, do it outside the…