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Major retailers recalling 207 million eggs after salmonella outbreak

More than 200 million eggs are being recalled after the Food and Drug Administration said they could be contaminated with salmonella. The agency said there have been 35 reported cases of illness, including 11 hospitalizations. No deaths have been reported. The FDA said that the outbreak could be traced to a single facility in Hyde County, North Carolina belonging to Rose Acre Farms in Seymour, Indiana. The farm is now recalling nearly 207,000,000 eggs that were sold at a variety of retailers and restaurants including Walmart, Publix, Food Lion and Waffle House. The recalled eggs were distributed in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. These are the affected egg brands: Coburn Farms Country Daybreak Crystal Farms Food Lion Glenview Great Value Nelms Sunshine Farms Waffle House For a full list of products, visit the FDA’s website here.  Salmonella is a bacteria infection that can cause…

People are drinking hydrogen peroxide for health reasons, and professionals warn against it

It seems ingesting toxic Tide Pods wasn’t enough for some. People are taking to social media with their claim that hydrogen peroxide is good for you, insisting that since it “only comes from water and oxygen” it must “boost oxygen levels in the body.” https://youtu.be/vXWXhp6aFuw Hydrogen peroxide is most commonly used to help prevent infection of minor cuts or scrapes, but strangely, it’s being used by some to treat everything from headaches to cancer — something doctors would strongly urge you NOT to do. Poison Control is clear that there is no scientific evidence to back this up. Though a tiny amount of Hydrogen Peroxide — like that in say, toothpaste — is not harmful, consuming the stuff can cause serious internal damage, confusion, strokes, heart attacks and clots in your lungs. Drinking hydrogen peroxide as a “natural cure or remedy” can be life-threatening, according to health experts. https://t.co/nNug5UTwDx pic.twitter.com/AJcUqwFunO — WebMD (@WebMD) February 11, 2017…

Stay away from Romaine Lettuce, report warns

Skip out that Caesar salad for a while. An E. coli outbreak that hit the United States late last week has been traced to romaine lettuce grown in certain regions of the country. The outbreak has affected 11 states so far, with a total of 35 cases reported, resulting in twenty-two hospitalizations. Luckily, no deaths have been reported. On April 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a statement advising consumers to find out the origin of their romaine before buying or eating. The lettuce causing concern was linked to Yuma, Arizona. The CDC reports that only lettuce from this region needs to be avoided or thrown away. However, just to be safe, Consumer Reports advises considers to avoid buying romaine altogether — at least until the outbreak is over. “Consumer Reports’ experts believe that it could be difficult for consumers to determine where the romaine they purchase is…

Here’s how long you’re contagious with the flu virus

If you’ve spent the last couple days cooped up inside your house fighting the flu and dozing off to Netflix, you may be wondering when you can return to civilization. You’re eager to do something constructive, yet you wouldn’t want to put your family or co-workers at risk for infection. So just how long are you contagious? Most people go back to work when their worst symptoms start to retreat, but that’s probably a little too early.  The CDC says you can be contagious the day before you start feeling sick and up to seven days after. Children, elderly and those with weak immune systems can be contagious even longer. Those unpleasant symptoms are actually the result of your immune system fighting the flu virus. For starters, your body increasing in temperature, resulting in a fever because the flu virus doesn’t spread as well at higher temperatures. And that mucus has…

How to safely roast a turkey this Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving hosts have a lot to worry about when preparing the year’s most anticipated feast; lumpy gravy, broken wine corks, unexpected dinner guests. But while there are plenty of things that can go wrong, there is only one thing that can truly turn the holiday merriment into misery. Food poisoning. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each year, about 48 million people will get sick from a foodborne illness. While summer’s picnics and camps are prime time for foodborne illness, these diseases also spike sharply during the holiday season. Marianne H. Gravely, Senior Technical Information Specialist of the Food Safety Education Staff at the USDA, gives us some tips on making sure you prepare a Thanksgiving feast that’s memorable — for all the right reasons. Storing a turkey before Thanksgiving Start by cleaning out your refrigerator. Whether you’re making all of the dishes yourself, or guests are bringing some to your house, all this food needs a place to…

Report shows restaurants that use most antibiotics in meats

Consumers Union has released its third annual “Chain Reaction” report on the prevalence of antibiotics in meat products in America’s most popular chain restaurants. Sadly, the results show most of the restaurants have failed to improve, even in the face of drug-resistant superbugs. The rankings are based on each companies’ own policies for the use of antibiotic in meat and poultry products that they buy. Pumping chickens, cows and pigs full of antibiotics intended for humans is slowly destroying our ability to treat common infections. The U.N. has called it a growing concern and potential global health crisis. More than 23,000 people die annually in the U.S. from antibiotic-resistant infections each year, according the the CDC. To combat this problem, doctors and hospitals use antibiotics more judiciously than in the past, yet 70 percent of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. aren’t intended for human use anyway, but rather in animal agriculture. “The nation’s fast food restaurant chains are…

Multi-state Salmonella outbreak linked to papayas sickens more than 200

A recent string of salmonella outbreaks may bring an early end to tropical summer fruit salads. Federal officials verified they have linked four separate salmonella outbreaks — totaling 215 illnesses — in recent months to papayas imported from Mexico. The outbreaks were reported from 26 different states. The majority of the outbreaks were initially concentrated in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and the South with New Jersey, Virginia and Texas reporting the highest number of instances. The salmonella scare has since spread to Arizona, Colorado and California. One Californian recently died, bringing the death toll to two. The other, a New Yorker, died after contracting salmonella in July. One California-based producer, Bravo Produce, issued a papaya recall after investigators traced bacteria to shipments from Tijuana. As standard procedure and in accordance with confidentiality laws, the FDA wouldn’t release the names if the retailers who sold the problematic produce. Instead, consumers are left to check their…