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9 Anthony Bourdain quotes on food and eating

Celebrity chef, travel writer, television host, and advocate Anthony Bourdain has died at age 61, but we will aways have his quotes to remember him by. His insight and wisdom encouraged us to climb out of our shells and explore the world, its food, and its cultures whenever possible. He was as much an award-winning wordsmith as he was a teacher, an explorer, and a foul-mouthed comedian. Below is a small collection of Bourdain’s thoughts on food, cooking and living life. On eating adventurously I’ve long believe that good food, good eating, is all about risk. Whether we’re talking about unpasteurized Stilton, raw oysters or working for organized crime ‘associates,’ food, for me, has always been an adventure.” On vegetarians To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.” On living life If I’m an advocate for anything, it’s to move.…

14 foods that have different names in the UK and US

Between binge watching The Crown, fascinations with the new Royal baby and the upcoming Royal wedding, it seems all of the Western world has become unapologetic Anglophiles. But just because you’ve taken up drinking tea and wearing Burberry doesn’t mean you’re a full-blown expert on British culture. In fact, you may even struggle just looking at a simple restaurant menu. Americans and Brits speak the same language, but after 400 years of history and one giant ocean of separation, navigating the two dialects can be difficult. For anyone planning an upcoming trip to England (or anyone just looking to expand their studies past six seasons of Downtown Abbey) here are 14 foods that go by different names across the pond. (UK — US) Abergine — Eggplant Brits call the purple vegetable “aubergine” instead of “eggplant.” Keep an eye out next time you’re shopping. Some American retailers have picked up on the word, and you’ll see that dark purple shirt or accessory…

JetBlue will fly NYC pizzas cross-country for delivery in LA

If you’ve ever felt the delivery area for Uber eats was just too darn small, let JetBlue give you hope for the future. In an amazing marketing stunt dubbed “Pie in the Sky,” the domestic airline carrier will travel cross-county to deliver authentic New York-style pizzas of the iconic Patsy’s Pizzeria of East Harlem to Los Angeles residents. Between May 9 and May 11, JetBlue will fly a total of 350 cheese and pepperoni pies from JFK to LAX each day. A team on the ground in LA will then see that it makes it directly to your door. And considering the cost of fuel and the salary of a professional pilot as your delivery driver, cheese is a very reasonable $12 and pepperoni $15. Ordering opens on www.jetblue.pizza at 12 a.m. PDT daily throughout the promotion. Patsy’s opened in East Harlem in 1933, and is one of the oldest…

Choosing this seat on the airplane will help you avoid getting sick, study says

If you dread stepping onboard an airplane for fear of getting sick, then you might want to double check your seat assignment. When it comes to immunity, nothing is a guarantee, but apparently you can increase your odds of avoiding sickness if you select a window seat and remain there for the whole flight. According to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, travelers moving about the cabin is more of a cause for concern than the recirculated air that gets such a bad rap. Since your seat assignment largely determines the likelihood you’ll get up from your seat, it also determines your chance of coming in contact with germs that will make you ill. People sitting in the aisle seats are 80% likely to walk about the cabin, while only 62% of middle seats and 43% of window seat customers do the same. So if you…

Olympic food halls satisfy large appetites with healthy fare

Supplying the breakfast of champions is no easy task. But when you also need to supply the lunch, dinner and snacks of champions, 24/7 for 14 days straight, it becomes a feat worthy of a medal. More than 6,000 Olympic athletes, officials and 1,700 Paralympic athletes and officials are reliant on the food halls in PyeongChang. During the entirety of the Olympic Games, nearly five million portions of meals will be served at 13 different venues. Every day about 180 chefs, including 30 halal cooks, prepare around 180 different meals for the dining halls and cafes. Athletes’ village kitchens are serving about 7,000 meals meals daily. If you’ve watched even a single Olympic event, it’s not hard to see why food becomes such a central part of the planning. Diet is a major factor in the daily lives of Olympians and Paralympians, whether they’re training back home or competing on an international stage. For athletes…

8 Christmas traditions from around the world

In today’s globalized economy, the Christmas holiday can seem a little too expected. Images of Santa Claus, decorated evergreen trees, and candy canes be found all over the world. But if you dig a little deeper, you can still find people celebrating the beloved holiday in their own special way — particularly with food. While you’re tearing up tissue paper and singing festive songs this Christmas morning, consider what people around the world might be doing to add to their holiday cheer. https://www.instagram.com/p/BcqXOPkn9mb/?tagged=japankfc Japan Christmas is not an official holiday in Japan, but that doesn’t stop people from waiting in long lines at their local KFC. So why all the love for the fast food joint? December 25 is the one day a year KFCs in Japan serve “Christmas Chicken” — a tradition that dates back to a wildly successful ad campaign from 1974. The campaign was so successful, the people still flock to KFC…

Flying with food: What you can bring through TSA security checkpoints this holiday

Inching your way through the airport security line the Wednesday before Thanksgiving is stressful and time-consuming enough. The last thing you want to do is be pulled aside by a TSA agent and forced to toss that great bottle of wine you got Dad simply because you forgot the liquid laws. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) estimates that 2.4 million passengers will pass through security checkpoints each day leading up to Thanksgiving. And holiday travel is expected to be up throughout the whole 2017 season. “Last year was a record breaking year for the airline industry, and this year is expected to break that,” said Michael England, TSA National Spokesman. Food and drink play a big role in the holidays, so it’s likely that many of these millions of travelers will attempt to take with them edible gifts, baked goods or maybe even a side dish of some sort. Fortunately for travelers, agency stipulations don’t have to…

A ranking of the most vegetarian-friendly countries in the world

If you don’t eat meat, dining out can present some challenges — in some countries more than others. In honor of World Vegetarian Month, Oliver’s Travels created an infographic ranking the world’s most vegetarian-friendly countries. They counted the number of veg-friendly restaurants, the number of people per each of those restaurants and the per capita meat consumption of the country. While this map doesn’t include the number of actual vegetarians living in a country, it does tell vegetarians travelers which counties will be easiest for them to navigate. While most people think of the United States as a heavily carnivorous country — hot dogs and hamburgers, Texas chili-cookoffs and holiday feasts focused on turkey — the US is actually quite accommodating with more vegetarian restaurants than any other country (18,975). Seychelles, however, has the most vegetarian restaurants per person with one for every 810 citizens. The list reveals other fun facts like Bhutan has…

Why we celebrate Oktoberfest in September

Every year millions of people around the world wonder why the German tradition known as Oktoberfest is celebrated primarily in the month of September. The annual celebration is best known for its beer, food and general celebration of German culture. But given the name, shouldn’t the shindig primarily take place in its namesake month? The official Oktoberfest website explains. The first Oktoberfest was held in 1810, with a one-day horse-race held as part of the wedding festivities for Bavarian King Ludwig I and his wife, Theresie. The crowd liked it so much, that it became an annual event, eventually developing into the world of marching bands, sausages and colorfully-dressed beer maidens we know today. But over the decades, the horse-race disappeared, and the event grew to more than two weeks long — stretching the event into mid-October. Since fall can be quite cold in Bavaria, even snowy, a decision was made to start the festivities earlier…

Icelandic Food: What to know before you go

“What exactly do they eat in Iceland?” is the first question I’m usually asked about my two week visit to the Nordic island country. Well, the answer isn’t for the faint of heart. The local diet hasn’t changed much since the Vikings settled the island sometime in the second half of the 9th century. The preparation of the food is, of course, much tastier than it would have been 1,200 years ago. It’s since had the benefit of other Scandinavian and European influences. The mainstays of the locals include lamb, potatoes, skyr, and lots and lots of seafood. For a country surrounding by Arctic waters, fishing is naturally the single most important sector of the economy. Fisheries employ up to 20 percent of the workforce. Many of the restaurants serve seafood caught same day. Haddock, herring, skate, salmon, lobster. Seafood is everywhere. And that’s the good news. As for the rest of the classic Icelandic dishes, well,…