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Spinach, ricotta stuffed peppers, a satisfying vegetarian alternative

Spinach, ricotta stuffed peppers are just the kind of recipe I like — cheesy, flavorful and easy to make. Best of all, they’re vegetarian, so it’s another satisfying meat-free dish to add to your recipe box (aka Pinterest page) if you’re cutting back. For the filling, cook up some garlic and onions, then add spinach and season. Mix ricotta and parmesan, then add to the spinach and mix more. Stuff this into 5-6 pepper halves and bake. I also like to toss tomatoes into the pan to get them right to the point that the skin slides off and the juicy middle pops in your mouth. Serve with rice or pasta if you’re making going for a dinner, but just a pepper, and some tomatoes — and maybe a small slice of bread — can make a fantastic light lunch. *Note, mushrooms are also a great addition. Chop up some of your favorite fungi and add to…

Simple watermelon salsa is sweet, mildly spicy

Who would have thought watermelon and jalapeño would be such a delicious pair? What’s better, is that this quick condiment only requires six ingredients. I’ve been experimenting with a lot of watermelon lately, so get ready for quite a few juicy recipes coming up.. This one was one of my favorites, since it’s a perfect match-up of sweet and spicy, combined with saltiness from the chips. I’ve only tried it as a salsa so far, but I could see this going great with grilled chicken or fish, or atop a grilled vegetable dinner. Watermelon Salsa Serves 6-8: Prep time 10 min Ingredients 4 cups watermelon (seedless, or seeds removed and chopped) 1 cup cucumber, chopped 1 cup red onion (about 1/2 large onion, chopped) 2 medium jalapeños (remove seeds for less heat, chopped) 1 cup fresh cilantro, chopped 1 lime, cut in half salt (to taste) Directions Add watermelon, cucumber, onion,…

History of Mexican Salsa

Salsa has been around for thousands of years. Its history can be traced to the Aztecs, Mayans and Incas who used various combinations of chilies, tomatoes and other spices as a type of condiment atop turkey, venison, lobster and fish to give their food more flavor. Salsa didn’t spread outside of Central American cuisine until the Spaniards arrived and conquered Mexico — between 1519 and 1921. Even then, the tomato-based condiment didn’t have a commonplace name. It wasn’t until 50 years later, in 1571, that a Spanish priest, missionary, and grammarian gave it the simple name salsa. Directly translated from Spanish, “salsa” simply means “sauce.” Today, salsa is a mix of Old World and New World ingredients. The tomatoes, tomatillos, and chillies are native to the Western Hemisphere, while many of the added spices such as onions and garlic have Old World origins. An increase in the popularity of spicy foods…

Cooking tips and techniques from chef Gordon Ramsay

Want to up your cooking game? Even great cooks can miss a skill set or two if they haven’t had formal training. But we live in a time when celebrity chefs are just a click away, and they’re eager to share their wealth of knowledge with the world. Practice these pro tips from chef Gordon Ramsey and you’ll look like you’ve mastered your culinary moves over years of training. Most importantly, you’ll reduce your food waste thereby helping the environment and saving yourself money. https://youtu.be/ZJy1ajvMU1k How to finely chop and onion The root, or the base of the onion is “absolutely crucial. Leave that on there. Cut that off, and the onion will start to bleed, and you’ll start crying rapidly,” he says. Ramsey tells us to slice the onion going forward and let the weight of the knife do the work. Then your three middle fingers — one in front and two behind — let the…

Appreciate the onion during winter

Winter cooking can be challenging. But with less to work with, you can focus on what’s available to you. That’s when true creativity comes. You think beyond your usual dinner menus and get inspired by ingredients that might otherwise get overlooked. At mealtime, it could mean paying attention to one of the most common yet underestimated ingredients of everyday cooking: onions. I mean plain, round storage onions, the ones we rarely think about—until there’s a crisis because they’re not in the house. Elizabeth Robins Pennell, an American who wrote about food in 19th- and early-20th-century London, spared no drama when praising the onion’s essential nature. “Banish it from the kitchen, and all pleasure of eating flies with it,” she wrote in an essay called “The Incomparable Onion.” “Its presence lends color and enchantment to the most modest dish; its absence reduces the rarest dainty to hopeless insipidity, and the diner to despair.” Not…