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carbs

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The man who invented sliced bread and the origins of the popular phrase

Lots of things are declared “the greatest thing since sliced bread,” but have you ever wondered, just what timeline we are talking here? Sliced bread is one of those inventions that seems like it should have always been part of our diets, and the accompanying phrase, forever part of our vernacular. But it’s much more recent than you would expect. So when was this ubiquitous food staple first invented? Bread is one of the world’s most commonly prepared foods — it’s also one of the oldest. There is evidence of humans making crude variations of the stuff as far back as the Neolithic era. Sliced bread, however? That’s a different story. For perspective, Queen Elizabeth II, Tony Bennett, and Betty White are all older than sliced bread. The first automatically sliced commercial loaves of bread didn’t hit production until July 6, 1928, in Chillicothe, Missouri. It was all made possible…

Is it safe to tear off the mold and eat the rest of the bread?

Bread. It’s one of those foods that you always like to have at your house, yet it gets moldy so quickly. When you see a loaf start to go bad you just rip off the green stuff and use the rest. All is good, right? Wrong. Unfortunately, that one little circle of moldy bread does ruin the whole loaf. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture recommends that you toss bread at the first sign of mold. It seems excessive, but it’s true. Studies have shown that mold has long, threadlike roots that can penetrate deep into the entirety of nearly any food it grows on. And mold is nothing to take lightly. The microscopic fungi can cause a wide range of health problems including allergic reactions, breathing problems, stomach problems, and some molds — those that produce the substances known as aflatoxins — can even cause liver cancer.…

This is why a baker’s dozen is 13

Ask for a dozen roses from a florist or a dozen eggs from a farmer, and you’ll expect to receive an even 12 items. But if you ask a baker for a dozen doughnuts, you could go home with 13, or a baker’s dozen. Not that we’re complaining, but why do bakers have their own unit of measurement? The next time you’re snacking on that 13th bonus treat, you can thank crooked bakers back in medieval England. According to Encyclopedia Britannica, there were laws that regulated that a loaf of bread was worth the price of the wheat used to make it. Bakers caught overpricing undersized loaves — apparently a practice common enough to necessitate regulation — saw harsh penalties including fines, beatings, and jail time. Anyone who has ever made baked goods knows that getting them to come out the same size isn’t easy. In the Middle Ages, most…

Eating this amount of pasta could add years on to your life

Carb lovers, rejoice! A new study suggests that eating pasta could help you live longer, while following low-carb diets such as Atkins could increase your risk of dying young. Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data on 432,179 people and found that those who ate a “moderate” amount of carbs — about 50 to 55 percent of calories from carbohydrates like potatoes, pasta, and bread — could expect to live about four years longer. The findings were published in The Lancet Public Health journal. The study found that those who eat low-carb diets are more likely to have a lower intake of fresh fruit, vegetables, and healthy grains, and in their place, substitute more meat. This decrease in the variety of nutrients can lead to an increase in biological aging and a shortened lifespan. While low-carb diets like Atkins have fueled thinking that carbs are somehow bad…

9 Food Myths That Just Won’t Die

Some food myths just won’t quit. They usually persist because people cling to old science or wives tales out of confusion or simply out of habit. Some myths stick around because they can be easier than the truth. Eating a balanced diet and getting enough sleep and exercise is usually the best course for fighting disease and maintaining overall health. But drinking alcohol to fall asleep and  then energy drinks to stay awake or lose weight is seen as easier and sexier… but it won’t give you the healthy results you seek. Here are 9 myths you should purge from your brain right now. Myth: The fewer carbs in your diet, the healthier you are Healthy truth: It’s true that most Americans eat more refined carbs and sugar than we should. These should definitely be avoided. But some carbohydrates are essential to a healthy diet, since they provide energy for your whole body. It’s best to get your cards from minimally processed…

Mashed potatoes made easy in the slow cooker

Jump to the fast track on Thanksgiving side dishes and make the most effortless mashed potatoes ever. Just set the slow cooker to high, load it with redskin potatoes, add a little water, butter and garlic, and in about four hours you’ll have perfectly rich and flavorful potatoes — no skin peeling and no boiling. Best of all, they’re fairly hands-off, so you’ll be able to use that extra time elsewhere. Slow Cooker Redskin Mashed Potatoes Makes about 10-12 servings Ingredients 3 pounds redskin potatoes, scrubbed (leave skin on) 1/4 cup butter 4 cloves crushed garlic, peeled 1/2 cup sour cream 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese About 1/4 cup milk (more as needed) 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 4 tablespoons fresh chives, chopped 1/4 cup water Directions  Place potatoes in slow cooker along with butter, garlic and water. Set to high for a cook time of 4 hours, then secure the lid. After 4 hours, potatoes…

Quinoa salad with cranberries and pecans

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) has come a long way. It was banished to the back of the health food store for decades only to be featured up front on national supermarket aisles the past few years. It’s high protein content and versatile texture have made quinoa a popular everyday grain. At the dinner table, it’s often substituted in place of former starchy favorites like pasta or white rice. But quinoa isn’t a new fad. Sure, it has recently picked up popularity in the United States and Europe, but it has been cultivated and eaten in the Andes for more than 5,000 years. It was known as “the mother grain” and “the gold of the Incas”, a testament to the importance of this grain to the Andean cultures. Today, it’s considered a superfood. It’s a complete protein source that’s also high in iron, magnesium and fiber, while also being extremely versatile and easy to cook with. Some estimates state…

How your favorite chefs make mashed potatoes

If there’s one side dish we can all agree deserves a spot on the Thanksgiving table it’s mashed potatoes, but how exactly those spuds are smashed will vary in every home across the country. Not all cooking methods are created equal, so we consulted our favorite celebrity chefs for tips on how to take this traditional holiday dish to the next level. Ina Garten The Barefoot Contessa swears that Yukon Gold potatoes, with their slightly yellow color, are the best variety for mashed tots. She runs them through a food mill, then adds rich butter and sour cream for this good old-fashioned comfort food. https://youtu.be/pTJMM4yusMg ALTON BROWN Alton and Ina must share recipes. This recipe is remarkably close to Ina’s, but it’s probably more of a professional consensus that this is, in fact, one of the best ways to make mashed potatoes. Alton also swears by running Yukon Gold potatoes through a food mill then adding butter, heavy cream,…

If you’re addicted to carbs, it might not be your fault

It turns out that those pasta and garlic bread binges might not be your fault. Yep. Not that it helps your waistline, but you might feel a tiny bit relieved. In a recent study, scientists discovered that some of us have a genuine weakness for carbohydrates, which makes us crave them even more. Our tastebuds are to blame. Some folks are more sensitive to the taste of starchy carbs, causing them to eat more of them — and likely gain weight as a result of this sensitivity, reported Newsweek. Scientists were surprised by these findings, since carbohydrates weren’t previously thought to have a taste. “It’s typically sugar, with its hedrnically pleasing sweet taste, that is the most sought after carbohydrate,” professor and lead researcher Russell Keast said in a statement. However, this new research shows that non-sweet carbs might actually have a detectable taste to some, Keast says. In fact, the research team…

25 Years of Loving Cheddar Bay Biscuits at Red Lobster

If all of the Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits served in one day were stacked up, it would tower the height of the Empire State Building 137 times! We’ve been eating Cheddar Bay Biscuits at Red Lobster for 25 years now. Surely that calculation would have our biscuit consumption reaching the moon and back. That’s right. For a quarter century we’ve been craving those fresh out-of-the-oven cheddary carb bombs. The mid-range seafood restaurant first starting offering the biscuits in 1992. Originally offered as “freshly baked, hot cheese garlic bread,” the biscuits changed name a few years later to better reflect the other seaside offerings of the restaurant and more accurately describe what they are — I mean, they are definitely biscuits, no? You may remember, they were also originally served to guests waiting to be seated, rather than in a basket table side. The biscuits became so popular, guests requested them…