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Hugh Hefner helped launch this food magazine

Hugh Hefner’s name brings to mind images of Hollywood parties and half-naked women. While the former media mogul’s is best know for Playboy, which he launched in 1953, he also had a hand in creating one of the most popular food magazines of today. Turns out, without Hefner we might not have Food & Wine. Swipe ➡️ for a peek inside our very first issue in 1978, which—yes, really—launched as a special insert for Playboy. Then tap the link in our bio for the astonishing Hugh Hefner magazine story you haven’t heard—that of Food & Wine. A post shared by Food & Wine (@foodandwine) on Sep 28, 2017 at 10:21am PDT The glossy insert originally was created as a supplement to Playboy’s March 1978 issue. Below an image of a scantily clad blonde gazing out of a red sports car, ran headlines about sex toys and an interview with Bob Dylan…

Coffee 101: The major differences between macchiatos, cappuccinos, lattes and more

These days we have a lot of ways to stay caffeinated. From cappuccinos to coffee, mochas to macchiatos, what’s really the difference between all these brews? Unless you’re a skilled barista or an all-around coffee aficionado, knowing the difference between drinks on a menu can be challenging. You’ll likely stick with one or two out of habit or comfort, but there might just be something you’d like more if you knew what it actually was. Love strong coffee? Go for the macchiato. Don’t like foam? A latte is your best bet. The difference between the most popular coffee house drinks usually lies in the cup’s ratios of espresso, milk and foam. Coffee foam is technically just steamed milk, but it’s been gently whipped to add air and give it that frothy texture. Mike Witherel, owner of Coffee Buddha in the North Hills of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania says, “We do our best to educate without hopefully coming across as pretentious.…

Report shows restaurants that use most antibiotics in meats

Consumers Union has released its third annual “Chain Reaction” report on the prevalence of antibiotics in meat products in America’s most popular chain restaurants. Sadly, the results show most of the restaurants have failed to improve, even in the face of drug-resistant superbugs. The rankings are based on each companies’ own policies for the use of antibiotic in meat and poultry products that they buy. Pumping chickens, cows and pigs full of antibiotics intended for humans is slowly destroying our ability to treat common infections. The U.N. has called it a growing concern and potential global health crisis. More than 23,000 people die annually in the U.S. from antibiotic-resistant infections each year, according the the CDC. To combat this problem, doctors and hospitals use antibiotics more judiciously than in the past, yet 70 percent of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. aren’t intended for human use anyway, but rather in animal agriculture. “The nation’s fast food restaurant chains are…

Where to get free coffee on National Coffee Day

National Coffee Day falls on a Friday this year, which mean you can guzzle as much free caffeine as you want without having to worry about falling asleep anytime soon. Here is a list of coffee deals and freebies you can score to celebrate on Sept. 29, 2017. Some national chains are serving up BOGO, while others are offering freebies in exchange for app downloads. Still, a few more are offering free coffee to anyone who wants it: No gimmicks — bless their hearts. 7-Eleven 7-Eleven stores are celebrating by giving a free cup of coffee to 7Rewards members who show the bar code located in their 7Rewards smartphone app. Offer good one time between Friday, Sept. 29 and Sunday, Oct. 1. Cinnabon Get a free 12 oz. coffee on Friday. Dunkin’ Donuts DD is having a BOGO free medium hot coffee with purchase of medium or large hot coffee. Krispy Kreme From Friday,…

National Pancake Day: Building Better Pancakes Through Chemistry

Batter up! Have you ever noticed how many cultures around the world have a version of pancakes? That many people can’t be wrong. Pancakes and their international cousins are delicious. But everyone seems to have a different recipe and different tricks to improve the height or flavor of their stack. So what really works? Sept. 25 is National Pancake Day. Check out this video from Reactions to learn to use chemistry to your advantage when flipping Saturday morning flapjacks: Better Pancakes Through Chemistry https://youtu.be/pMhrV9sRjqI And try this pumpkin pancake stack, perfect for fall.  For pancake mixes that fit your diet, visit everybodycravespantry.com.

What side of aluminum foil should you cook on?

You’ve probably notice by now that foil has two distinct sides: one that’s shiny and one that’s dull. You may even swear that one side is better for cooking than the other. So what’s the truth behind this two-faced tin foil conundrum? It would be natural to think that the shiny side would reflect more heat and maybe create a more effective surface for cooking. So if you use the shiny side, you’re right. But if you use the dull side, you’re also right — you’re both right! According to Reynold’s Kitchen, the different textures on the two sides have nothing to do with cooking efficiencies, but rather, the manufacturing process. Reynold’s explains in the FAQS on the company website: The foil is ‘milled’ in layers during production. Milling is a process whereby heat and tension is applied to stretch the foil to the desired thickness. We mill two layers in contact…

Teacher’s “Bread Trick” Reminds Kids Hand Washing is important

Flu season is officially here. It’s time to stock up hand sanitizers, antibacterial soap and, of course, Kleenex. If you or your kids ever questioned if maybe our modern obsession with hand washing wasn’t just all a little overboard, just ask Donna Gill Allen, a Health Occupation teacher at Cape Fear High school in Fayetteville, North Carolina. A shocking experiment Allen did with her students has gone viral. “You let all the kids see you put a piece of bread in a baggy with a glove on, hence “controlled,” then you wash your hands and put a piece of bread in a baggy for “clean.” Last, but definitely not least, you pass a piece of bread around and let every kid in class touch it, then you put it in a baggy and label it dirty,” Allen said in a Facebook post. Then you let the bags sit in a place where…

20 Ways to Beat Stomach Bloating

When you’re battling a bad case of bloating, it can be hard to stay focused. Everyone has been there. Your pants feel tight, your abdomen tightens and you might even feel some stomach pains or unusual growling. About 10 percent of people say they experience the symptoms of bloating regularly. Bloating is usually tied to what you eat. While beans and broccoli are a great part of a long-term weight-loss goal, they can actually be part of the problem in the moment. Eating large meals, rich and fatty foods and eating too fast also all add to the risk of bloating. If you’re one in ten Americans who experience this discomfort, there are a few simple changes you can make that may help. Sip on Water Everyone knows you need to get enough water to stay hydrated, but water helps you from becoming constipated? Water helps keeps things moving and may also help keep you…

National Pizza Day: A Slice of Shared Italian-American History

(Originally published Feb. 8, 2017 for National Pizza Day) This year you will likely eat about 23 pounds of pizza. And you’re not alone in your cheese-laden love affair. Collectively, Americans will devour about 3 billion pizzas before the end of this calendar year. September 20 is National Pepperoni Pizza Day, and we should take a minute to consider whether there is any other single food that has captured our cultural creativity or embraced our ever-changing, national heritage more than this versatile staple? Pizza embodies the region where it is made. For independent pizzeria owners, it’s a labor or love. More than 75,000 pizza restaurants make up 17% of all restaurants nationwide. In the U.S., pizza has become a passion. But of course we know, like most foods, Americans can’t take credit for its invention. The origins of pizza could actually be credited to anyone who first learned the secret of…

Here’s the Most Hated Food in Each State

Having similar dislikes is just as important as having similar likes for some people. But that’s the idea behind date app Hater. The app was launched earlier this year and promises to match users based on their mutual disdain for anything from fashion stylers to celebrities and even certain foods — wouldn’t it settle so many pizza delivery problems if you and your partner both hated Hawaiian pizza? Well, the people behind Hater compiled information from more than 600,000 users to show us a profile of what foods are most commonly hated state-by-state. Some findings aren’t surprising. Washington, the coffee capital of the country, hates Keurig K-cups, while Texans who pride themselves in the meat market, can’t stand their steak cooked well done. And Vermont, the New England King of Cheese, wants nothing to do with that artificial spray cheese from a can. But some of them are hard to rationalize. How…