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Organic foods reduce your risk of certain cancers, study shows

If you’re still not a believer in organic food, consider a new study that suggests it can save you from some cancers. The study, published earlier this week in JAMA Internal medicine, found that those who frequently ate organic foods, had an overall lower risk of developing cancer. Specifically, those who primarily consumed organic foods where more likely to ward off postmenopausal breast cancer and non-Hodgkin Lymphoma than those who rarely or never ate organic. The study looked at the diets of 68,946 French adult volunteers. Researchers divided them into four groups depending on how often they said they ate organic foods including fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, ready-to-eat meals, vegetable oils and condiments, dietary supplements and other products. Participants were checked on, about four and a half years later. During that time, the volunteers developed 1,340 cancers. Breast cancer being the most common (459), followed by prostate cancer…

Nutrition or exercise: Which is better for your bones?

Which is better for your bones: a healthy diet or exercise? It’s a question that scientists would love to answer, and one that could greatly benefit humans as we undergo the aging process. A new study conducted by the University of Michigan and published in PLOS One aimed to answer this conundrum. Researchers looked at mineral supplementation and exercise in mice and  were surprised by the results. Nutrition, it appears, has a greater impact on bone mass and strength than exercise. Furthermore, even after the test mice stopped exercising, they retained the bone strength they gained, as long as they ate a healthy, mineral-supplemented diet. While the study was done on mice, it makes sense. David Kohn, a University of Michigan professor in the schools of dentistry and engineering and the study’s lead author, said, “If you think about the progression to humans, diet is easier for someone to carry on…

Junk food increases your risk of depression, study shows

While you may think that burger from your favorite fast food joint will bring you a boost of happiness, a new study shows that the opposite is actually true. The study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, suggests that eating junk food raises the risk of depression, the Guardian reported. The research calls for doctors to give dietary advice to patients along with their other individualized treatment for depression. The findings are the results of the analysis of researchers from Britain, Spain, Finland and Australia, among other countries, who data-mined 41 other previous studies linking diet and depression. Researchers found that foods containing lots of sugar, fat, or those that are highly processed, commonly let to inflammation in the body. The study said that chronic inflammation can negatively affect brain chemistry, leading to illnesses like depression. Junk foods can also impact the neurotransmitters responsible for mood swings, so that quick…

Airport security bins are dirtier than toilets, study shows

The dirtiest thing you’ll encounter at the airport isn’t the toilet seat. Nor is the tray tables or even your sniffling seat mate. According to a study from the University of Nottingham and the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, it’s those plastic security trays that are the filled with the most infectious diseases. The research was published in BMC Infectious Diseases, which found 10 respiratory viruses including the flu and common cold lingering on various surfaces through the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland. Scientists visited several times during the 2015-16 flu season and collected germ samples at various times of the day. As it turns out, the bins that hold your cell phone, shoes, purse, coat, and other belongings that need scanned for security, had more germs than any other area tested — including toilet, elevator buttons, and even the flight check-in kiosks. The virus found could easily cause you…

Whole milk might be healthier than skim milk, study shows

For years, experts have been telling us that full-fat dairy products like whole milk are loaded with scary saturated fats and the low-fat dairy options like skim milk are better for us. But recent research suggests that full-fat dairy may actually be healthier than and more beneficial than previously thought. The new research, published in The Lancet, found that people who eat full-fat dairy aren’t any more likely to develop heart disease or type 2 diabetes than those who opted for the low-fat versions. In fact, they might even be less likely to pack on the pounds. The observational study compiled data from about 136,000 adults across 21 countries on five continues. None of the participants had a history of heart disease, and they all completed detailed surveys, answering questions about type and frequency of dairy intake. The study found that dairy consumptions — no matter what kind — was…

Blowing out birthday candles boosts bacteria to disgusting levels

Birthday cake lovers, beware. If you’ve ever taken part of the classic birthday ritual — you know: dimmed lights, loud singing of “Happy Birthday” followed by candle blowing — you’ve participated in a very disgusting tradition. Researchers at Clemson University recently conducted a study to find out whether significant bacteria is transferred to the cake when someone blows out their candles. Mimicking a traditional child’s birthday party, participants ate several slices of pizza before volunteering to blow out candles on top of an ordinary birthday cake. A control group cake had no party-goers blow on it. Then the two were compared. Researchers found that the cake where the candles had been blown out had more than 1,400% more bacteria than the cake that was left alone. Interestingly, people blew greatly varied number of bacteria — some didn’t transfer any, and some, for whatever reason, transferred a lot. (Maybe a germaphobic researcher out…

Study shows picky eaters care how food is presented on a plate

If you have a picky eater at home, there might be one more thing you can try. A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Food Science found that kids do actually notice — and care — how their food is presented to them, and this can influence how much of the food they eat. It turns out, that young children are more inclined to eat when food items are kept separate from one another. Researchers asked 100 children ages 7 to 8 and 12 to 14 to prioritize six different photos of dishes of food plated three different ways: one with food items separated; one with the food separate but ingredients mixed (like chicken with gravy touching the rice, but vegetables on the side); and another with food all mixed together. Among the youngest age group, girls preferred foods to be separated, while the…

A third of Americans have missed a football game due to heavy tailgating

On bright and brisk falls mornings all over the country, you’ll find Americans gearing up for their favorite pastime — tailgating. While football, of course, is the main event, the tailgating subculture has become just as much of a mainstay of Saturday or Sunday mornings as the game itself. Research from YouGov revels an inside look at what Americans are drinking, their habits and how many participate. About 77% of respondents said they drink alcohol before the event, but 21% said they preferred to stay sober. One third of Americans said they drink alcohol at every tailgate they attend a game. College fans said that Bud Light, Samuel Adams, Blue Moon and Corona are the beers most likely to make an appearance in their game day coolers, while Jack Daniels, Baileys and Smirnoff are the preferred tailgating liquors. Frito-Lay’s chips, grilled Johnsonville sausages and cans of Campbells soup are the preferred snacks to…

Men are embarrassed to adopt vegetarian diets, study shows

Vegetarian and vegan diets might be having a moment, but according to a study conducted by the British University of Southhampton, men are embarrassed to order vegetarian food. Researches with the Man Food Project surveyed 22 men to explore the social and cultural pressures men are under when it comes to dining out. The group was split into three categories: men who were vegetarian for environmental reasons, those who wanted to build muscle without relying on meat, and those who were on economically restricted diets. In most cases, regardless of the reasons behind their diet, the participants expressed embarrassment and shame around ordering meatless meals. “A number of them relayed different experiences that indicated shame, embarrassment, or conflict-avoidance that on occasion led them to eat meat, or offer meat to guests in their house,” Dr. Emma Roe, lead researcher and professor at the University of Southhamton, told Munchies. Roe explained…

If you hated gym glass as a kid, you probably hate working out now

Middle school gym class. What exactly comes to mind when you hear those words might just determine your feelings on exercising in your adult life. Researchers from Iowa State University surveyed more than 1,000 Americans, aged 18 to 40 years old, using a specially created lengthy online questionnaire. Scientists then analyzed participants’ positive or negative attitudes toward gym class with the participants’ current behavior and attitudes toward physical fitness. Participants also were asked to describe in detail, their best and worst memories from gym class. For those who disliked gym class, their worst memories typically involved embarrassment, bullying, or a general lack on enjoyment. Seven percent of people shared their best memory as a day when they skipped gym class or didn’t have to take it any more. Not surprisingly, people who reported enjoying gym class were more likely to respond that they enjoy physical activities today. They were also…