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Yo-yo dieting can lead to early death, study suggests

You pack on some serious pounds, then work hard to drop the weight — but then put it all back on again. Aside from being incredibly frustrating for the individual, experts are now warning that these dramatic fluctuations in weight are linked to a slew of negative side effects — including an increased risk of death. The new study was published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers investigated the health risks of yo-yo dieting by examining the results from the 3,600 men and women who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. They found that dramatic weight swings was associated with higher risk of mortality. One exception to this study is for obese individuals who crash diet and experience weight loss. Those people were found to be less likely to develop type-2 diabetes over time. However, perfectly healthy people who quickly lose and gain…

How to avoid gaining weight during a cold winter

Winter started early this year, with many areas of the country seeing snowfall even before Thanksgiving. The East Coast was blasted with a freeze that sent frost and snow as far south as the Carolinas. Temperatures across the country dipped into the  low 20s —  And that was just the first few weeks of winter. It’s shaping up to be a particularly long, cold winter. But cold weather is no excuse to binge on booze and fatty comfort foods. It’s easy to reach for that mac and cheese, chili or homemade chocolate chip cookies when the weather stays dreary and cold outside, but you’ll most certainly regret it later. Here are a few tips to help you prevent winter weight gain: Watch your alcohol intake It might be tempting to pour yourself another glass of wine, or spike a little something in your hot chocolate, but on average, an alcoholic drink will add an extra 150…

Is it safe to tear off the mold and eat the rest of the bread?

Bread. It’s one of those foods that you always like to have at your house, yet it gets moldy so quickly. When you see a loaf start to go bad you just rip off the green stuff and use the rest. All is good, right? Wrong. Unfortunately, that one little circle of moldy bread does ruin the whole loaf. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture recommends that you toss bread at the first sign of mold. It seems excessive, but it’s true. Studies have shown that mold has long, threadlike roots that can penetrate deep into the entirety of nearly any food it grows on. And mold is nothing to take lightly. The microscopic fungi can cause a wide range of health problems including allergic reactions, breathing problems, stomach problems, and some molds — those that produce the substances known as aflatoxins — can even cause liver cancer.…

Tips for adjusting to Daylight Savings Time

Whether you love or hate Daylight Savings Time, you’re probably at least looking forward to getting an extra hour of sleep on Sunday. The National Sleep Foundation reports that about 20 percent of Americans get less than six hours of sleep. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked lack of sleep with other issues like vehicle crashes and on-the-job injuries. While, gaining an hour of sleep in thae fall is typically easier for people than the loss-of-sleep in the spring, it can still mess with your body’s rhythm and cause you to miss your body’s natural shut-eye cues. Adjusting to time changes is different for everyone, but there are a few tips you can take to help ease into the new schedule. Start preparing today. Sometimes, make the hour move in one day is too much, especially for families with kids. Begin pushing your daily routine a little…

Six ingredients commonly found in gum, soda, candy banned by the FDA

Just in time to squash your Halloween fun, the Food and Drug Administration has nixed six synthetic flavorings commonly found in candy, soda, baked goods, booze, and gum. The ingredients in question have all been shown to directly contribute to cancer in animals. They included synthetically-derived benzophenone (also used in rubber reusable food containers), ethyl acrylate, eugenic methyl ether (methyl eugenol), myrcene, pulegone, and pyridine. Even if you’re an avid label checker, these names probably don’t look familiar to you. Since they fall under the umbrella of proprietary “artificial flavors,” the manufacturers don’t have to print them in the ingredients list, according the FDA. The additives are known to contribute floral, cinnamon, mint, citrus, mango, pineapple, garlic, roasted onion, and woody flavors, according to a petition.  The ingredients were proven to cause cancer in laboratory animals by the United States Department of Health and Human Services’ National Toxicology Program. But no…

Being in a relationship makes you fat, study shows

Being in a relationship can be good for your health, but it’s not always the best on your body. A new study shows that having a long-term partner can leave you likely to pack on the pounds. The study, conducted by researchers at Central Queensland University in Australia, tracked more than 15,000 people over 10 years.  On average, those who identified as part of a couple weighed 12.7 pounds more than those who were single. Furthermore, those with serious partners gained, on average, about 3.9 pounds per year! Of course, this study confirms what many of us have experienced throughout our lives. Once you’re comfortable, you may feel less pressure to keep up appearances and watch your weight as closely as you did when you were single. “When couples don’t need to look attractive and slim to attract a partner, they may feel more comfortably eating more foods high in…

5 big ways eating pumpkin seeds could improve your health

They may be small, but pumpkin seeds pack a nutritional punch. Like nuts, pumpkin seeds are a great source of protein and healthy fats including omega-3. Eating only a small amount of them will provide you with substantial levels of many of the nutrients and minerals you need. In a one ounce serving (28 grams), you’ll get 151 calories — mostly from fat and protein — but also zinc (14%), magnesium (37%), iron (23%), vitamin K (18%), zinc (14%), copper (19%), manganese (42%), and phosphorus (33%). Pumpkin seeds may appear on menus or products by the name “pepita” — a Mexican Spanish term. This typically denotes that the white, hard seed you usually see when you carve a pumpkin, has been shelled, and you can expect only the flat, green, oval interior seed. Because of their profile, pumpkin seeds have been linked to improved heart health, prostate health, and protection…

Easy 20-minute Bone Broth Chicken Noodle Soup

Think back to your childhood. If there was one guarantee when you got sick, it was that Grandma would be making you a big batch of chicken noodle soup. But does chicken noodle soup have any actual impact on impending sniffles? According to UPMC, when you’re sick, your immune system can receive support to help fight infections from standard cold and over-the-counter medicines. However, in some cases, the nutrients you get from a big bowl of chicken noodle soup can give additional aid to that support system. Studies have shows that the anti-inflammatory effects from the ingredients in chicken noodle soup can help ease cold symptoms, while the warm broth can clear nasal congestion. So while it may not be a miracle cure-all, chicken noodle soup makes a great meal when you’re feeling under the weather because it’s packed with nutrients. They are easy to digest, soothing to the throat…

Americans urged to get flu shots after last year’s 80,000 death toll reported

Eighty thousand people died from the flu last year — that’s more than the number of people killed in car accidents, gun violence, or opioid overdoses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging people to get flu shots early this year, especially those who are vulnerable or those with weakened immune systems including pregnant women, children, and older adults. The new data comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which said last year was the deadliest flu season in more than four decades. Flu experts knew it was going to be a bad season, but the tally was nearly twice the estimate health officials originally projected. The high mortality rate last winter was driven by a type of flu that tends to land more people in the hospital and cause more deaths. Making the situation worse, the flu vaccine didn’t work very well. Despite the limitations of…

Is plastic better than wood?: The cutting board debate

Whether you cook three times a day or three times a year, you probably own a cutting board. It’s a kitchen staple with one simple job, but without it, you wouldn’t have anywhere to cut, chop, dice, or slice your meats, apples, and onions. While you may know you need a cutting board, do you know when you should choose a wooden board over a plastic one, or vice versa? After all, anything your food touches can be a source of contamination and foodborne illness, so kitchen tools and care are no small decision. As it turns out, there are some major differences between boards you should know before you head to the store. Wood versus plastic For most of history, chopping blocks then cutting boards were all made of wood. But the invention of modern plastics in 1907 meant that plastic utensils slowly began making its way into people’s…