Tag

fall

Browsing

A handy guide to helping you plan Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the biggest feast of the year. There’s so much to think about and plan for, you’re going to want a guide going in so you don’t forget anything. What to do right now The guest list. It’s likely to change, but getting an idea of how many people are going to come can help you start to estimate what and how much you’ll need. Order a turkey. Don’t leave this one up to chance at the grocery store. If you wait too long to pick up a bird, you might be scrambling. Plus, ordering ahead gives you a chance to order the right size and type of turkey you want. And you know it will be fresh. Check your housewares. Go through your linens and dishes and make sure you have everything you need, from baking dishes to napkins, salads bowls, silverware, and even towels, sheets and toiletries if…

November produce: What’s in season?

Summer might seem like the time for the tastiest fruits and the vegetables, but there is plenty of produce that grows in colder weather or even in neighboring tropical climates. Fruits and veggies tastes best when you eat them in season, so while you might be bummed your favorite berries are bitter this time of year, there are still tons of great options for eating in season items that are ripe right now. Here is what will give you peak flavor in November: Apples Apples are the perfect fall ingredients, adding flavor to foods both sweet and savory. Plus, they’re delicious all on their own. Chop fresh apples in your oatmeal, bread, or yogurt for a healthy dose of fiber, vitamin B-6, and vitamin C. Artichokes Artichokes are delicious and fun to eat. They make an appearance at many holiday tables because they are ripe and ready this time of year.…

Easy cream free pumpkin bisque

This pumpkin bisque soup is made with ingredients you likely already have at your house. Isn’t it great when that happens? No special stop at the grocery store required — just get right to cooking, and this soup will be ready in 20 minutes. This recipe is perfect for cool, crisp October and November when everyone is craving pumpkin. But it’s easy enough, you’ll be tempted to make it all year long. It’s so tasty, there’s no reason not to! There is a hint of curry, but if it’s not your favorite, don’t be alarmed. It’s a fairly subtle flavor. The same goes for the coconut milk. They’re there, but they’re not overpowering. This recipe can easily be adapted to be vegan — just use vegetable broth. It’s also naturally dairy-free, so it’s great for serving when you’re not totally sure the modern day diets of your group of family…

Mummy Rice Krispie Treats

Whether you are age two or 92, Rice Krispie squares are sure to bring smiles. This season, create a little spooky fun with the classic treat and add a white chocolate drizzle to turn them into yummy mummies. These easy-to-make treats would be cute individually wrapped for Halloween parties at school or even just as a surprise for your family or friends. Mummy Rice Krispie Treats Ingredients 6 cups Rice Krispie cereal 1 10-ounce bag mini marshmallows 3 tbsp butter + 1 tsp for greasing pan and spatula 1 cup white chocolate candy melts Candy eyes Directions Line a 9×13 baking dish with parchment paper, leaving enough hanging over the sides so you can grab and pull out the treats later. Grease the parchment paper with butter to prevent sticking. Rub butter on spatula and set aside. In a large pot, slowly melt 3 tbsp butter — careful not to burn.…

The truth behind 8 common food and drink urban legends

It turns out, some of the food urban legends you heard on the playground as a kid are still around today. While some of them ended up to be true (like, the occasional alligator living in a sewer), most are far from it (like, “throwing a penny from a skyscraper will kill someone”). But in the world of kid-dom, folklore is strong, and maybe never moreso than around Halloween time when the spookiness of the holiday mixes with the fear of approaching strangers houses. But frankly, we’ve all probably just had too much sugar. Whatever the reason, here are 8 of the most persistent food and drink related urban legends: https://youtu.be/vYEXzx-TINc The legend: Pop rocks Little Mikey from Life cereal died from eating Pop Rocks and soda. True or False? False The facts Little Mikey was known to all kids thanks to his television fame, yet few people knew his actual…

Chocolate Pumpkin muffins

These dense and chocolatey muffins hit the just right spot for fall. The pumpkin keeps them super moist and adds just a hint of a fall flavor. Devour them as dessert, breakfast, or as a snack along with your tea or coffee. Note that this recipe makes two dozen muffins because 12 disappear way too fast! Chocolate Pumpkin muffins Makes 24 muffins (2 pans of 12) Ingredients 3-3/4 cups all purpose flour 3 1/2 cups sugar 1 cup baking cocoa powder 1-1/2 tsp baking powder 1-1/4 tsp baking soda 1-1/2 tsp salt 1-1/4 tsp ground cloves 1/2 tsp nutmeg 3 large eggs 2 cans (15 ounce) pumpkin puree 1-1/4 cups canola oil 1-1/2 tsp vanilla extract 2 cups semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup pepitas Directions Preheat over to 350ºF. Spray 12-count muffin pan with cooking spray. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk to combine the dry ingredients — flour,…

Slow cooker cinnamon roll oatmeal

This month has been crazy. I’d probably be eating cold cereal for breakfast, lunch, and dinner if I didn’t have some help once in a while. I’ve been putting some serious milage on my slow cooker! This cinnamon roll oatmeal is the fourth batch of slow cooker oats I’ve made this month, and it’s definitely one of my favorites. If you’re a fan of cinnamon rolls — and I mean, who isn’t?! — you’re going to love this healthier take on everyone’s favorite decadent dessert. Of course, the cream cheese drizzle makes this not-so-diet-friendly, but you can either skip it, or use it lightly, just for a bit of flavor and fun. Even without the drizzle, you’ll still enjoy the cinnamon roll taste. Oh! And bonus! Your whole house will be filled with the delicious smell of cinnamon. And if you’ve never added eggs to your slow cooker oatmeal before,…

Tips for storing your Halloween candy so it will last longer

The end of October typically means way too much candy — even for those with the most insatiable sweet tooth. Whether you have kids bringing home big bags of candy, or you overestimated how much you needed for trick-or-treating, chances are, you’re going to need to store some for later. If you want to enjoy your candy haul slowly, it’s vital you know how to properly store your candies. If not, you could end up with a melty mess or scary flavors later on. Candy bars are very high in sugar and low in moisture — a combination that inhibits bacterial growth. This keeps them naturally edible for really long periods of time, but you can extend their shelf-life even further with a little care. Here are some tips from the National Confectioners Association that will leave your candy tasting fresh, long after your jack-o-lantern has gone dark. Candy Storage in…

Why do apples turn brown when you cut them?

You come back from a quick trip to the copy room at work and discover that the beautiful apple you just bit into minutes ago is now brown and unappetizing. Why does this happen? As it turns out, the moment an apple is sliced, chopped, or bitten, a biochemical reaction commonly called “enzymatic browning” begins to take place. Specifically, the enzyme known as polyphenol oxidase (PPO) oxidizes polyphenols within the flesh of the fruit. This results in new chemicals (o-quinones) that react with amino acids and produce brown-colored melanins. But this discoloration can be avoided — somewhat. Not all apples brown at the same rate. Different apples contain different types of enzymes and polyphenols, thus altering their rate of discoloration. The Arctic Apple is genetically engineered to have non-browning flesh, but there are non-GMO apples that have this quality, as well. Cameo, SnowSweet, Cortland, Gala, Ambrosia, and Ginger Gold are…

Is there a difference between apple cider and apple juice?

Apples are the star fruit of fall: Whether they’re baked in a pie or spiced in a sauce, it’s obvious we love celebrating the return of apple season. But there’s one way we can consume apples that causes confusion even among the most ardent apple connoisseurs — cider. More specifically, what’s the difference between the stuff we scoop up exclusively during September and October at markets and that other stuff available on the grocery shelf all year long? This is how you make apple cider: Here is the difference between apple cider and apple juice: Apple Cider Apple cider is made from fresh apples that have been pressed into liquid. To make apple cider, apples are first washed and cut, then ground into a mash that’s about the consistency of apple sauce. The mash is then wrapped in burlap cloth and placed between wooden racks. A hydraulic press squeezes…