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People are drinking hydrogen peroxide for health reasons, and professionals warn against it

It seems ingesting toxic Tide Pods wasn’t enough for some. People are taking to social media with their claim that hydrogen peroxide is good for you, insisting that since it “only comes from water and oxygen” it must “boost oxygen levels in the body.” https://youtu.be/vXWXhp6aFuw Hydrogen peroxide is most commonly used to help prevent infection of minor cuts or scrapes, but strangely, it’s being used by some to treat everything from headaches to cancer — something doctors would strongly urge you NOT to do. Poison Control is clear that there is no scientific evidence to back this up. Though a tiny amount of Hydrogen Peroxide — like that in say, toothpaste — is not harmful, consuming the stuff can cause serious internal damage, confusion, strokes, heart attacks and clots in your lungs. Drinking hydrogen peroxide as a “natural cure or remedy” can be life-threatening, according to health experts. https://t.co/nNug5UTwDx pic.twitter.com/AJcUqwFunO — WebMD (@WebMD) February 11, 2017…

Here’s how to spring clean your spice rack

You might be diligent about spring cleaning every year, but when was the last time you cleaned out your spice rack? Spices and herbs don’t spoil the same way produce or dairy does, but time does cause them to lose their potency and flavor. To help you decide what to keep and what to toss, McCormick Spice posted some interesting information on Facebook. According the Maryland-based spice maker, any spice label that says “Baltimore, MD” is way out of date. The company hasn’t produced spices there for at least 25 years. McCormick was founded in 1889 in downtown Baltimore, Maryland, but moved it’s production plant to Hunt Valley, Maryland about a quarter century ago. McCormick recommends replacing their ground spices, like nutmeg, cinnamon or curry, every two or three years, and their whole spices, like cloves, every three to four years. Seeds such as anise have a shelf life of about four…

Experts say this is the best way to load silverware in a dishwasher

At some point it’s likely that you’ve opened a dishwasher to find your spouse or roommate loaded or rearranged it in a way you felt very strongly about. Chances are, how you load a dishwasher is nearly ingrained in you at this point, and whether grounded in truth or not, you have ideas about how the task is done most efficiently. This includes the decision to load silverware handle side up or handle side down. An ongoing poll on Houzz shows that people are split nearly 50/50 on the debate. The handle-side-up argument states that knives and forks can cause serious injuries to the person who will be unloading the machine. The handle-side-down camp insists that cutlery doesn’t get nearly as clean when it’s hidden in the basket, and also that handle side pointing down allows for less silverware overall to fit in each load. So which is the correct way? TipHero looked at various…

10 Surprising Uses for Vodka

We know we can drink it — and drink, and drink, and drink it… — but did you know that vodka can be used from everything from dulling dental pains to banishing soap scum? Here are 10 surprising uses for the popular distilled drink. make the Crunchiest fried chicken Fried chicken isn’t even worth eating unless you can count on that delicious crispy crust. Did you know, adding a bit of vodka to the batter can help fried foods reach maximum crispiness? Because vodka evaporates more quickly than water, the batter will dry out faster, creating larger bubbles in the batter resulting in a crispier crust for your fried chicken. Everyday cleaning If cleaning with harsh chemical give you the creeps, consider vodka. First, soak a cloth in the clear liquid, and the tackle areas with difficult soap scum or water spots. Prevent mildew from growing by spritzing your bathroom tiles with vodka. Let the stuff…

Stop bacteria from building up in your knife block

How to Clean a Knife Block Your floors, fridge, countertops and even oven make in on to your regular cleaning checklist, but there’s one surface in your kitchen you have probably never even touched. Consider your knife block. Sure, your knives are clean when you stow them in the slots, but dust and other debris can accumulate in these small spaces anyway. Despite our usual disregard for them, knife blocks should actually be washed and sanitized monthly if use frequently. Moisture can lead to mold and bacteria build-up, so to avoid larger cleaning issues, wash knives after each use and dry each thoroughly before sliding back into the knife block. Sanitize a knife block by following these simple steps: Step 1: Remove any knives stored in the block and set aside. Turn the block upside side over the sink and shake lightly to remove large debris. Step 2: Use a…