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These are the top beer producing countries in Europe, report shows

As an American beer drinker, when you think of European beers, Germany is probably first country to come to mind. Of course, Germany is well-known for its annual Oktoberfest party, big beer steins, and influence on American beers. But the United Kingdom has had a major influence as well, thanks to the ever rising popularity of the India pale ale. And what about the profusion of Irish pubs and Guinness? If you think about it, it would be hard to guess what country in Europe actually produces the most beer. Food Ingredients First reported that The Brewers of Europe trade association released data report from last year. Seven nations were highlighted as top beer producers. Unsurprisingly, Germany led the list, producing 9.3 billion liters of beer in 2017 — accounting for 23 percent of Europe’s beer production. The United Kingdom and Poland tied for second place with production at 4…

New study predicts climate change could cause beer prices to soar

If all the data on global warming hasn’t scared you yet, maybe this will: Rising temperatures could mean less beer. A new study published in the peer-reviewed British journal Nature Plants reported that current predictions of the next few decades see beer becoming scarce and thus more far expensive — as much as twice the cost by some estimates. This scarcity will be the result of a decrease in the production of barely, the main ingredient in beer. Scientists have long known that barely is one of the most heat-sensitive crops. The predicted severe droughts and extreme heat could cause significant losses. Average barely crop losses could range from three to 16 percent, depending on the severity of the climate change. In the US alone, shortages could reduce the amount Americans drink by up to 900 million gallons — that’s 9 billion bottles of beer! According to the study, this decrease in…

Why we celebrate Oktoberfest in September

Every year millions of people around the world wonder why the German tradition known as Oktoberfest is celebrated primarily in the month of September. The annual celebration is best known for its beer, food and general celebration of German culture. But given the name, shouldn’t the shindig primarily take place in its namesake month? The official Oktoberfest website explains. The first Oktoberfest was held in 1810, with a one-day horse-race held as part of the wedding festivities for Bavarian King Ludwig I and his wife, Theresie. The crowd liked it so much, that it became an annual event, eventually developing into the world of marching bands, sausages and colorfully-dressed beer maidens we know today. But over the decades, the horse-race disappeared, and the event grew to more than two weeks long — stretching the event into mid-October. Since fall can be quite cold in Bavaria, even snowy, a decision was made to start the festivities earlier…

A third of Americans have missed a football game due to heavy tailgating

On bright and brisk falls mornings all over the country, you’ll find Americans gearing up for their favorite pastime — tailgating. While football, of course, is the main event, the tailgating subculture has become just as much of a mainstay of Saturday or Sunday mornings as the game itself. Research from YouGov revels an inside look at what Americans are drinking, their habits and how many participate. About 77% of respondents said they drink alcohol before the event, but 21% said they preferred to stay sober. One third of Americans said they drink alcohol at every tailgate they attend a game. College fans said that Bud Light, Samuel Adams, Blue Moon and Corona are the beers most likely to make an appearance in their game day coolers, while Jack Daniels, Baileys and Smirnoff are the preferred tailgating liquors. Frito-Lay’s chips, grilled Johnsonville sausages and cans of Campbells soup are the preferred snacks to…

International Beer Day: Most popular beers in 10 countries

In honor of International Beer Day on Aug. 3, here’s a look at the top 10 countries (by population) and their beer of choice. China Snow — This affordable lager produced by China Resources holds nearly a 25 percent market share in China, according to Forbes. India Kingfisher — United Breweries’ Kingfisher brand holds almost half of the country’s market, according to Beer Connoisseur. United States Bud Light — Although Budweiser calls itself the King of Beers, Bud Light is actually the tops in the country, with 33.1 million barrels shipped in 2017, according to 24/7 Wall Street. Indonesia Bintang — Multi Bintang Indonesia’s portfolio of beers, across several categories, has helped it maintain its status as the top-selling beer, according to EuroMonitor. Brazil Skol — Owned by ABInBev, one of the largest beer conglomerates in the world, owns a 34 percent market share, according to Statista. Pakistan Murree Brewery…

This is what college students say would get them to drink less

Binge drinking is a major problem on U.S. college campuses. An estimated 40 percent of students engage it in regularly, despite the numerous negative consequences. So how do you get college students to stop drinking? Convince them that giving up the booze will help their grades, relationships and improve their health, one study showed. The findings were recently published in the Journal of American Osteopathic Association. Researchers surveyed nearly 300 college students over the age of 18 and asked them to report any binge drinking they had participated in during the past 30 days (September 2017), and then followed up with the same inquiry three weeks later. The students were asked about their willingness to initiate and participate in healthier drinking habits, as well as what factors they deemed necessary for a successful change. Lead researcher Dr. Manoj Sharma, professor of behavioral health at Jackson State University, said in a press release by the American Osteopathic…

Brussel sprout chips with a kick

Brussels sprouts aren’t exactly the most-beloved vegetable at the market. But as a member of the nutritious cruciferous family — think cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli — they should have a place in your healthy diet. Brussels sprouts are the killer combination of being both high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, but low in calories. A half cup of cooked sprouts is just 28 calories, but has 137 percent of your vitamin K (good for blood clotting and bone health), and 80 percent of your vitamin C (immune functions) along with other nutrients like vitamin B6, potassium, iron, thiamine, magnesium, and phosphorus. For people who don’t get enough fish or seafood, Brussels sprouts can be a good plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids. They’ve also been shows to keep blood sugar levels steady, and some studies suggest that their high levels of antioxidants can help protect against certain types of cancer. Phew! That’s…

Bottled beer or canned beer? One study puts the debate to rest

Can you tell? Can you actually tell? Does beer taste better from a bottle or from a can? Do a quick poll at happy hour, and you’ll likely find that most people say beer tastes better when it comes from a bottle versus the canned version of the same stuff. But what accounts for this preference? Are cans somehow cast in a negative light? Is it something less desirable about the packaging’s shape or weight? Or maybe the metal itself imparts some type of flavor on the beer that makes it a less desirable drink. What’s really going on behind this beer phenomenon? A study published in the journal Beverages sought to answer this question once and for all. Researchers developed a three part study that looked at all possibilities. Step 1 – questioning First, participants were asked to fill out a short questionnaire on demographics and drinking habits. On average, participants reported drinking…

Studies showing moderate drinking is healthy were funded by alcohol industry

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Yet, here we are again, believing that drinking promotes heart health or that a small amount of booze is better than exercise for those of a certain age. Unfortunately, new reports shows that these benefits, among others, might be skewed because the studies were funded by big alcohol companies. According to HuffPost: If you’ve ever seen headlines about how red wine is good for your heart, or how moderate alcohol use is linked to longer life, you’ve seen the alcohol industry’s influence on health science at work. And Americans seem to be swallowing that message. A 2015 Gallup poll found that 1 in 5 Americans believe “moderate” drinking is good for health, and that this was especially true among those who drink alcohol. The New York Times recently reported that a 10-year $100 million study underway at the National Institutes of Health was largely funded by alcohol…

Marijuana-infused ‘beer’ on the way from Blue Moon inventor

Keith Villa developed Blue Moon Belgian White beer back in the 1990s, and now he’s turning his attention to marijuana-infused non-alcoholic “beer.” Villa’s company, Ceria Beverages, is working with ebbu, a cannabinoid research company, to be the first to produce a non-alcoholic craft beverage infused with marijuana’s primary psychoactive chemical, THC. Several beers infused with cannabidiol (CBD), THC’s non-psychoactive cousin, are on the market, but Villa is looking for something different. “CBD is not the component that most consumers look for,” Villa told Brewbound. “It certainly has its merits… But the THC is what gives people that buzz, which is similar to the alcohol buzz that people get from beer, spirits and wine. A lot of consumers of cannabis look for that buzz.” The aim is to provide an alternative — that will be a bit more expensive — to alcoholic beer that can create sensations like chill or euphoria.…